Women from the Golden Legend

Women from the Golden Legend

Female Authority in a Medieval Castilian Sanctoral

Emma Gatland

Hardback
$99.00

Tamesis Books

Overview

Overview

This book examines one collection of saints' lives, or sanctorals, and the twenty-five female saints witnessed therein. Included in the study are transcriptions of twenty-two previously unedited lives.
Hagiography was one of the most prolific narrative genres in the Middle Ages. Jacobus de Voragine's Golden Legend (c. 1260), the most popular compendium, was translated into every language in Western Europe. In the medieval Iberian peninsula, the number of conserved hagiographic documents dwarfs those belonging to other narrative genres. This book examines one collection of saints' lives, or sanctorals, and the twenty-five female saints witnessed therein. Their lives furnished exemplary models for women inside and outside the Church, and tell stories of maidens tortured by pagan sovereigns, prostitutes, mothers who see their sons martyred, and women who dress as men in order to avoid being married off to the nearest suitor. This study challenges an understanding of these women as passive recipients of social and spiritual influence by re-situating female authority within the context of vision, language, and performativity. Included in the study are transcriptions of twenty-two previously unedited lives.

Emma Gatland is a Leverhulme Early Career Fellow, University of Cambridge.

Details

October 2011
266 pages
23.4x15.6 cm
Monografias A
ISBN: 9781855662292
Format: Hardback
Library eBook
Tamesis Books
BIC HRCL, 1DSE, 2AB, 3H
BISAC LIT011000, LIT004280, REL010000
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Table of Contents

Acknowledgements
List of Abbreviations
Introduction
Vision
Language
Performativity
Conclusion
Appendix
Works Cited

Reviews

Gatland shows herself a balanced, observant, and entertaining interpreter of this material, which, perhaps more than any other medieval subject-matter, is still rendered acutely difficult by unresolved textual indeterminacy. THE CATHOLIC HISTORICAL REVIEW, February 2014

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