The Sea in History - The Modern World

The Sea in History - The Modern World

Christian Buchet

Edited by N.A.M. Rodger

Hardback
$220.00

Boydell Press

Overview

Overview

An assessment of how important the sea has been in the development of modern history.
How important has the sea been in the development of human history? Very important indeed is the conclusion of this ground-breaking four volume work. The books bring together the world's leading maritime historians, who address the question of what difference the sea has made in relation to around 250 situations ranging from the earliest times to the present. They consider, across the entire world, subjects related to human migration, trade, economic development, warfare, the building of political units including states and empires, the dissemination of ideas, culture and religion, and much more, showing how the sea was crucial to all these aspects of human development.
The Sea in History - The Modern World covers the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, when the global reach of major powers frequently brought them into conflict with each other, including conflict at sea. The many majors wars at sea of the period are discussed, as are the planning and strategic thinking of the major powers in cases both where war followed and where it did not, and in addition the role and thinking of less important powers such as Portugal and Denmark are analysed. The book considers how in this first great age of 'globalisation' seaborne trade helped many countries to prosperity by participation in the global economy, a process halted by the First World War and not resumed until the 1950s. The book also examines maritime resources including fishing and whaling; ships, shipbuilding, ports and navigation; and the logistics of supporting long distance maritime activity. One very interesting chapter on late imperial China shows how China's then failure to take maritime issues seriously was a major factor in the empire's collapse.

58 of the contributions are in English; 6 are in French.

N. A. M. RODGER is a Senior Research Fellow at All Souls College, Oxford CHRISTIAN BUCHET is Professor of Maritime History, Catholic University of Paris, Scientific Director of Océanides and a member of l'Académie de marine.

Published with Océanides Founded in March 2012, Océanides is a five-year, international research project which aims to provide scientific evidence of the key role seas and oceans have played in human evolution, culture and history.

Its primary objective is to provide the most global overview of maritime history to date, spanning five millennia and five continents. It aims to give policy makers the necessary tools with which to understand the close connection between humans and the sea, to appreciate the evidence of its crucial role in our future and to improve worldwide maritime policy.

For more information please see www.oceanides-association.org, @ProjetOceanides, Facebook: Association Oceanides

Details

February 2017
6 black and white, 17 line illustrations
848 pages
23.4x15.6 cm
ISBN: 9781783271603
Format: Hardback
Library eBook
Boydell Press
BIC HBTM, 1QS, 3J
BISAC HIS037000, HIS037030, HIS027150
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Table of Contents

Introduction - N.A.M. Rodger (All Souls College, Oxford)
The Sea and Seapower within the International System - Paul Kennedy (Yale University)
Germany, 1870-1914: a military empire turns to the sea - Michael Epkenhans (Centre for Military History and Social Sciences of the Bundeswehr, Germany)
The Imperial Japanese Navy, 1937-1942 - Richard B. Frank (United States)
The US as a new naval power, 1890-1919 - Kenneth J. Hagan (U.S. Naval Academy)
World war suspended and resumed: Russia, 1919-1940 - Gunnar Åselius (Swedish Defence University)
Freedom and control of the seas, 1856-1919 - Gabriela A. Frei (University of Oxford)
UNCLOS and the Modern Law of the Sea - Sam Bateman (University of Wollongong)
New Navies and Maritime Powers - Steven Haines (University of Greenwich)
Britain, 1815-1850: naval power or sea power? - Andrew Lambert (King's College London)
Free trade, industrialization and the global economy, 1815-1914 - Kevin Hjortshøj O'Rourke (All Souls College, Oxford)
Coal and the Sea - Sarah Palmer (University of Greenwich)
Shipbuilding and Power: Some Reflections - Alan Lemmers (Netherlands Institute of Military History)
Maintaining Naval Hegemony in the Industrial Age: Britain, 1850-1889 - John F. Beeler (University of Alabama)
Naval Armaments Races, 1889-1922 - Jon Tetsuro Sumida (University of Maryland)
The British Empire and the War at Sea, 1914-1918 - David Stevens (Department of Defence, Canberra, Australia)
Steaming worldwide waters: adaptation and transformation in the Netherlands - Anita M.C. van Dissel (Leiden University)
Austria-Hungary: An Inland Empire Looks to the Sea - Lawrence Sondhaus (University of Indianapolis)
The Ottoman Empire and the sea, 1789-1922 - Colin Heywood (University of Hull)
Italy, 1861-1914: did the sea build a State and an Empire? - Francesco Zampieri (Naval Staff College, Italy)
Imperial failure of the industrial age: Spain, 1805-1898 - Jesús M. Valdaliso (University of the Basque Country)
Denmark, a small power with a growing shipping industry - Anders Monrad Møller (University of Copenhagen)
Sweden and the Sea in the 19th Century - Leos Müller (Stockholm University)
Navies, Internal Order and Trade in South America, 1830-1914 - Brian Vale (United Kingdom)
The Sea and the American Civil War - Craig L. Symonds (US Naval Academy)
The Wider Caribbean during the 19th and 20th centuries - Johanna von Grafenstein (Instituto Mora, Mexico)
Ship Canals - Graeme J. Milne (University of Liverpool)
Oil and Water - Patrick Alderton (United Kingdom)
Imperial failure in the industrial age: China, 1842-1911 - S.C.M. Paine (US Naval War College)
China Turns to the Sea: 1912-1990 - Bruce A. Elleman (US Naval War College)
India and the Sea - James Goldrick (University of New South Wales at Canberra)
Les îles d'Océanie et l'ouverture sur la mer à l'heure de la première mondialisation contemporaine - Claire Laux (Sciences Po Bordeaux)
Maritime Labour - Alastair Couper (Cardiff University)
Fisheries - Ingo Heidbrink (Old Dominion University, United States and University of Hull, United Kingdom)
Geographical Determinism and the Growth of the American Whaling and Sealing Industries - Michael P. Dyer (New Bedford Whaling Museum, United States)
La France et la mer 1815-1914 - Michèle Battesti (Institut de echerche stratégique de l'École militaire, Paris)
Russia tries the new naval technologies, 1815-1914 - Norman Saul (University of Kansas)
The First World War and Japan: from the Anglo-Japanese Alliance to the Washington Treaty - Yoichi Hirama (Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force)
The Sea in the Great War - Avner Offer (University of Oxford)
The Mediterranean and World War I - Paul G. Halpern (Florida State University)
Germany in World War One: Naval Strategy and Warfare - Werner Rahn (Captain (ret.) of the German Navy)
The Sea in German Grand Strategy, 1919 - 1939/40 - Werner Rahn (Captain (ret.) of the German Navy)
The Case of Germany in the First Part of World War II - 1939-1942 - Jörg Hillmann (Captain in the German Navy attached to the European Defence Agency in Brussels)
Britain on the Defensive, 1939 -1942 - W.J.R. Gardner (Naval Historical Branch, Ministry of Defence, United Kingdom)
Britain and the Sea, 1943-45 - Christopher Baxter (Queen's University Belfast)
The Washington Treaty Era, 1919-1936: naval arms limitation - Phillips Payson O'Brien (London School of Economics)
The Washington Treaty Era: Neutralising the Pacific - Christopher M. Bell (Dalhousie University)
The United States and the Second World War - Nicholas Evan Sarantakes (US Naval War College)
The sea as a decisive factor in the Second World War - Evan Mawdsley (University of Glasgow)
The sea and the rise of the dictators: Italy, 1919--40 - MacGregor Knox (London School of Economics and Political Science)
The Italian Offensive, 1940 to 1941 - Simon Ball (University of Leeds)
The Sea and the Cold War - Norman Friedman (US Naval Institute)
NATO as a maritime alliance in the Cold War - Eric Grove (Society for Nautical Research and the Royal Historical Society, United Kingdom)
The Sea and the Soviet Empire - Colin S. Gray (University of Reading)
The sea and the economic slump, 1919-39 - Martin Daunton (University of Cambridge)
Océans et globalisation depuis 1945 - Hubert Bonin (Sciences Po Bordeaux and University of Bordeaux)
America's Pacific Power in a Global Age - Andrew Preston (University of Cambridge)
Les nouvelles ressources océaniques - Alain Beltran (CNRS, France)
Hiérarchies portuaires dans le monde et changements régionaux de connectivité maritime, 1890-2010 - César Ducruet (CNRS, France) and Bruno Marnot (University of La Rochelle)
Between empires and institutions: non-state actors and the sea since 1945 - Martin N. Murphy (King's College London)
The Narcotics Trade and the Sea - Peter Chalk (Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, California)
Climate Change and World Trade - Mark Maslin (University College London)
La France et la mer depuis 1945: une mutation inachevée - Philippe Vial (Centre d'Etudes d'Histoire de la Défense, MoD, France)
Changes in Naval Power and Seaborne Trade in Postwar Asian Waters - Geoffrey Till (King's College London)
Looking to the Future - Jeremy Black (University of Exeter)
Conclusion - N.A.M. Rodger (All Souls College, Oxford)

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