The Creation of Gothic Architecture, vols I and II

The Creation of Gothic Architecture, vols I and II

The Evolution of Foliate Capitals, 1170-1250

John James


West Grinstead Publications



First part of 5-part history of the development of Gothic in the churches of the Paris Basin, 1120-1250.
The Creation of Gothic Architecture is a five-part illustrated thesaurus of the Early Gothic churches in the limestone region of northern France known as the Paris Basin. It focuses on the transformation from romanesque to gothic architecture during the years between 1120 and 1250, and when complete it will provide a comprehensive pictorial history of the 1,420 churches of the Paris Basin. Most of these churches, which represent a vital step in the evolution of western European architecture, are barely known outside the region, and have been little recorded. The completed project will: provide a photographic description of all the more significant churches; analyse stylistic changes to foliate capitals and vault-erection techniques; establish a foundation for dating the contruction phases of the churches; and, using this chronology, will identify the time and place for each of the creative ideas, inventions and innovations that produced the gothic style, follow their evolution from place to place, and identify the major creators. Dr JOHN JAMES is a world authority on medieval architecture, author of over sixty books and articles.


October 2002
9000 black and white illustrations
1632 pages
29.7x21 cm
Creation of Gothic Architecture
ISBN: 9780959600582
Format: Hardback
West Grinstead Publications
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In this monumental study, James and several collaborators have brought together a formidable resource. The scale of James' enterprise far surpasses any previous attempts at the systematic collection of this type of data, which is why this study is so very useful.(...)These volumes are a fundamental resource for the study of medieval art in northern France, and every library associated with the teaching of medieval art and architecture should have them. SPECULUM

No serious art-historical library should be without it. (The publisher) is to be congratulated for taking on this epic venture. THE BURLINGTON MAGAZINE.

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