Taking Stock of German Studies in the United States

Taking Stock of German Studies in the United States

The New Millennium

Edited by Rachel J. Halverson, Carol Anne Costabile-Heming

Hardback
$75.00

Camden House

Overview

Overview

Examines the challenges facing German-language study in the new millennium and highlights how creative, innovative, inspired approaches have allowed it to weather many of them.

In the last decade, cuts have been made to foreign-language programs in the United States across all levels of education, German programs among them. Despite this, enrollments in German programs have increased modestly. The importance of Germany and its language on the world stage is undeniable: it has demonstrated its strength as a major world economic power, and Germany continues to invest heavily throughout the world. Inspired by the leadership of Helene Zimmer-Loew, longtime Executive Director of the American Association of Teachers of German, the contributors to this volume examine the factors shaping German-language study in the new millennium. They highlight how innovative curricular design, creative applied research, inspirational leadership, inventive professional development, and entrepreneurial approaches have allowed German to weather many of its challenges. This volume will be of interest to scholars, teachers, and students of German who are committed to invigorating its study in the United States.

Contributors: Teresa R. Bell, Regina Braker, Kurt Buhanan and Glenn S. Levine, Albrecht Classen, Kathleen Condray, Rachel J. Halverson, Martin Kagel and William Collins Donahue, Lynn Marie Kutch, Aleidine J. Moeller and Sheri Hurlbut, Traci S. O'Brien, Lynne Tatlock, Frank Trommler, Gregory H. Wolf.

Rachel J. Halverson is Marianna Merritt and Donald S. Matteson Distinguished Professor in Foreign Languages and Cultures at Washington State University. Carol Anne Costabile-Heming is Professor of German in the Department of World Languages, Literatures, and Cultures at the University of North Texas.

Details

October 2015
324 pages
9x6 in
Studies in German Literature Linguistics and Culture
ISBN: 9781571139139
Format: Hardback
Library eBook
Camden House
BIC CJA, 1KBB, 2AB, 3JM
BISAC EDU015000, EDU025000
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Table of Contents

Introduction: Challenges and Opportunities for the Study of German
German Studies: The Short Version
Ten Years of the "Making of Modern Europe"-Language, History, and Culture: A Retrospective
Medieval Studies within German Studies: The Nibelungenlied and Hartmann von Aue's Der arme Heinrich
Thriving in the New Normal: Meeting the Challenges of Doing More with Less in Twenty-First-Century German Studies
Responding to a Changing Profession: A Reflection on AATG Programs and their Effects on German at a Liberal Arts Institution
EIKK: A Case for Professional Development
The KEFKO Summer Seminar in Leipzig: Making Sense of the Proficiency Assessment to Articulate Program Curriculum and Study Abroad
Leadership and Its Ripple Effect on Research
Woher und wohin? Twenty-Six Years of Die Unterrichtspraxis/Teaching German
Matching Student and Teaching Perceptions for the Retention of University German Students
"Guidelines" for Future Professionals: A Case for Graduate Training in Assessment
Enhancing and Sustaining University German Programs through Consortium Building
An Immodest Proposal: Re-envisioning German Studies through European Integration
Selected Bibliography
Notes on the Contributors
Index

Reviews

(A)n outstanding collection of essays for anyone working in the field of German studies. . . . (It is) especially suited for those seeking ideas for reinvigorating their programs, and for individuals interested in gaining insights into the historical developments of German studies in the United States. DIE UNTERRICHTSPRAXIS

(A) timely contribution to the essential discussion about the future of German Studies in this country. . . . (P)resents a wide variety of field-tested strategies that tackle disciplinary issues and concerns. . . . (H)ighly recommend(ed) to anybody concerned with the state of German Studies now and in the future. WOMEN IN GERMAN NEWSLETTER

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