Peace through Law

Peace through Law

Britain and the International Court in the 1920s

Lorna Lloyd

Hardback
$90.00

Currently out of stock

Royal Historical Society

Overview

Overview

Lucid and meticulous... a significant contribution to the study both of British foreign policy and the League of Nations. ENGLISH HISTORICAL REVIEW Study of British reaction to the League of Nations' promotion of compulsory jurisdiction of the Permanent Court of International Justice at The Hague.
Lucid and meticulous... a significant contribution to the study both of British foreign policy and the League of Nations in the 1920s. ENGLISH HISTORICAL REVIEW This is the first book to examine the legal and political factors behind the policy of Britain and the British Dominions (Canada, Australia, South Africa, New Zealand and the Irish Free State) towards the League of Nations' attempt in the 1920s to persuade states to accept the compulsory jurisdiction of the Permanent Court of International Justice at The Hague. The British Government was initially publicly opposed to this, but the importance of the `peace through law' approach in Geneva and in British politics, and a favourable international climate, led Britain to accept compulsory adjudication by the end of the decade.
The book is based on an exhaustive examination of British documents, and on discussions with one of the major British exponents of the `peace through law' approach, Philip Noel-Baker. It throws light on the attitudes of great powers towards international adjudication, and on an approach to peace that after years of neglect appears to have regained prominence with the ending of the Cold War.
Dr LORNA LLOYD is Lecturer in International Relations at Keele University.

Details

April 1997
320 pages
23.4x15.6 cm
Royal Historical Society Studies in History
ISBN: 9780861932351
Format: Hardback
Library eBook
Royal Historical Society
BIC HBLL
BISAC POL011000
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Reviews

Lucid and meticulous... a significant contribution to the study both of British foreign policy and the League of Nations in the 1920s. ENGLISH HISTORICAL REVIEW On (the compulsory jurisdiction question) the work is excellently done and thoroughly researched... Every would-be historian of the World Court should look at this book and the material the author has so skilfully collected and deployed. INTERNATIONAL AND COMPARATIVE LAW QUARTERLY Tremendously detailed and enjoyable to read... Lloyd superbly describes and analyses the processes and pressures that led to the British declaration and signature. INTERNATIONAL HISTORY REVIEW

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