Namibia's Post-Apartheid Regional Institutions

Namibia's Post-Apartheid Regional Institutions

The Founding Year

Joshua B. Forrest

Hardback
$75.00

Currently out of stock

University of Rochester Press

Overview

Overview

An in-depth look at the development of democracy in Namibia during the year the Regional and National Councils began to function.
Namibia's Post-Apartheid Regional Institutions is an examination of the development of regional policy-making and organizational behavior of Namibia's regional institutions in their founding year, as they were established after independence from South Africa in 1990. The study emphasizes the importance of focusing on the microlevel dynamics and communications of public organizations in order to understand the intricacies of decentralization, in Namibia as in other parts of the world. The author shows clearly that a focus on the capacity-building activities of elected regional councils and parliaments can reveal important aspects of the strengthening of new democracies.

Joshua Bernard Forrest is associate professor of Political Science at the University of Vermont and an expert on state-building in sub-Saharan Africa.

Details

November 1998
2 black and white, 12 line illustrations
424 pages
22.8x15.2 in
Rochester Studies in African History and the Diaspora
ISBN: 9781580460286
Format: Hardback
Library eBook
University of Rochester Press
BIC GTB
BISAC POL030000, POL011010
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Reviews

It is a significant contribution to understanding the decentralization process that is of increasing importance to democratization in African states. --CHOICE, May 1999

This, then, is a book of exceptional methodological sophistication, exemplary documentation, persuasive logic, and considerable comparative significance beyond the borders of Namibia and Southern Africa. --AFRICAN STUDIES REVIEW

An interesting and highly competent account of modern Namibia. --COMMONWEALTH & COMPARATIVE POLITICS

This work is a worthwhile addition to the literature on post-independence public administration in Namibia. --JOURNAL OF LEGISLATIVE STUDIES

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