Jewish-German Identity in the Orientalist Literature of Else Lasker-Schüler, Friedrich Wolf, and Franz Werfel

Jewish-German Identity in the Orientalist Literature of Else Lasker-Schüler, Friedrich Wolf, and Franz Werfel

Donna K. Heizer

Hardback
$60.00

Currently out of stock

Camden House

Overview

Overview

First study of Jewish-German Orientalist literature as revealed in the works of three important twentieth-century authors.
This pioneering volume is the first to examine the phenomenon of Jewish-German orientalist literature. For many Jewish-German authors of the twentieth-century, the Orient represented an imaginative space where they could analyse their position as Jews in German society, and come to terms with a divided identity. Here, representations of Muslims and Islamicate cultures in the works of popular and respected authors who were nevertheless often seen as Jewish, Oriental 'others' by the German-speaking societies in which they lived are explored. Lasker-Schüler's Die Nächte Tino von Bagdads (1907) and Der Prinz von Theben (1912) create a timeless Orient filled with visionary artists like herself, while Wolf's Mohammed: Ein Oratorium (1922) depicts the Orient as the birthplace of the message of justice espoused by Islam: through it Wolf reaches a new understanding of his position as a progressive Jew in a war-torn German society. In Werfel's Die vierzig Tage des Musa Dagh (1933), the author uses the conflict between Turks and Armenians to explore his own religiosity.

Details

April 1996
3 black and white, 2 line illustrations
126 pages
22.8x15.2 in
Studies in German Literature Linguistics and Culture
ISBN: 9781571130259
Format: Hardback
Camden House
BIC DSB
BISAC LIT004170
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Reviews

An informative, intelligent text that is a pleasure to read. SOUTH ATLANTIC REVIEW
"Important contribution to the rather underdeveloped field of German postcolonial studies." INTERNATIONAL REVIEW OF MODERNISM

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