Hanover and the British Empire, 1700-1837

Hanover and the British Empire, 1700-1837

Nick Harding


Boydell Press



A reappraisal of the links between Hanover and Great Britain, highlighting their previously un-explored importance.
The dynastic union which existed between Great Britain and Hanover between 1714 and 1837 is often seen as simply a subject for diplomatic historians, of not much consequence. In fact, as this book shows, the connection between Great Britain and Hanover was an important theme which featured significantly in political and intellectual writing at the time, both in Hanover and in Britain, especially in discourses, including in pamphlet literature, about the nature of "empire", Britain's empire and Hanover's place within it. The book traces the evolution of such thinking over the entire period of the union, demonstrating that there was a strong European element to British imperial thinking, alongside the well-recognised overseas maritime commercial element. It examines how Hanover affected British policy in Europe throughout the period, and how the British connection affected Hanover, both in periods of peace and periods of warfare, when Hanoverian mercenaries were used extensively by Britain, and when Hanover often felt that its interests were not best served by the British connection. Overall, the book shows that Britain's relationship with Hanover was much deeper and more complex than personal union, and that Europe and Hanover featured very significantly in British imperial thinking.

NICK HARDING is Visiting Assistant Professor at the University of North Florida.


June 2007
4 black and white illustrations
292 pages
23.4x15.6 cm
Studies in Early Modern Cultural, Political and Social History
ISBN: 9781843833000
Format: Hardback
Library eBook
Boydell Press
Share on Facebook   Share on Twitter   Pin it   Share by Email

Table of Contents

The War of Austrian Succession
The Seven Years' War
The American Revolution
The French Revolution


This valuable work represents an advance in a number of directions. EHR
As an assessment of both British and Hanoverian conceptions of empire each over the other, Harding's work is first-rate, worthy of emulation in the scope of its research and in its engaging style. INTERNATIONAL HISTORY REVIEW, June 2008

Also in Series