French Organ Music from the Revolution to Franck and Widor

French Organ Music from the Revolution to Franck and Widor

Edited by Lawrence Archbold, William Peterson

Paperback
$39.95

University of Rochester Press

Overview

Overview

Essays by prominent scholars and organists examine the music of Franck and other nineteenth-century French organist-composers through stylistic analysis, study of compositional process, and exploration of how ideas about organ technique and performance-practice traditions developed and became codified.
Nineteenth-century French organ music attracts an ever-increasing number of performers and devotees. The music of Cesar Franck and other distinguished composers-Boëly, Guilmant, Widor-and the impact upon this repertoire of the organ-building achievements of Aristide Cavaillé-Coll, are here explored through stylistic analysis, the study of the compositional process, and the exploration of how ideas about organ technique and performance practice traditions developed and became codified. New consideration is also given to the political and cultural contexts within which Franck and other French organist-composers worked.

Contributors: Kimberley Marshall, William J. Peterson, Benjamin van Wye, Craig Cramer, Jesse E. Eschbach, Karen Hastings-Deans, Marie-Louise Jaquet-Langlasi, Daniel Roth, Edward Zimmerman, Lawrence Archbold, Rollin Smith

Details

October 1995
15 black and white illustrations
337 pages
22.8x15.2 in
Eastman Studies in Music
ISBN: 9781580460712
Format: Paperback
Library eBook
University of Rochester Press
BIC AV
BISAC MUS023000
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Reviews

Excellent scholarship; highly recommended for all academic collections. --CHOICE

Lawrence Archbold and William J. Peterson have amassed the quintessential scholarly compendium. . . . For recitalists, informed teachers, and students of the Romantic period, this is required reading and study. --AMERICAN ORGANIST

An enormous amount of scholarly investigation has gone into this volume. . . a thoroughly admirable piece of work. --MUSIC AND LETTERS

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