A Pleasing Sinne

A Pleasing Sinne

Drink and Conviviality in Seventeenth-Century England

Edited by Adam Smyth

Hardback
$99.00

D.S.Brewer

Overview

Overview

Studies of the representation and understanding of drink and conviviality in diverse social contexts.
By discussing diverse social contexts - from the Inns of Court to rural Derbyshire - contributors ask what kinds of etiquettes and rituals governed different drinking communities in the seventeenth century. What was the significance of particular drink for particular social contexts? How exclusive were drinking communities? And what happened when outsiders breached these coteries? The role of gender in drinking and sociability in considered, including the ambiguous figure of the female drinker: was alcohol a source of female empowerment or a mechanism to enforce a patriarchal culture? The influence of particular kinds of drink - claret, port, beer, ale, cider, perry - and particular kinds of drinkers in generating discourses of politics, nationalism, and xenophobia is considered; and the received views of moderation and excess are analysed: while early modern medicinal tracts championed measured drinking of wine and beer as a cure for sickness, drunkenness was consistently and dramatically aligned with physical decay, madness and sedition. The range of texts discussed is broad: popular broadside ballads and husbandry manuals; dramatic works; verse collections; manuscript miscellanies; scientific and medical tracts; and political treaties.
Contributors: STELLA ACHILLEOS, KAREN BRITLAND, CEDRIC C. BROWN, TANYA CASSIDY, LOUISE HILL CURTH, ANGELA MCSHANE JONES, MARIKA KEBLUSEK, CHARLES C. LUDINGTON, CHARLOTTE MCBRIDE, MICHELLE O'CALLAGHAN, SUSAN J. OWEN, VITTORIA DI PALMA, ADAM SMYTH.

Details

August 2004
7 black and white illustrations
242 pages
23.4x15.6 cm
Studies in Renaissance Literature
ISBN: 9781843840091
Format: Hardback
D.S.Brewer
BIC DSBD, 1DBKE, 2AB, 3JD, 4P
BISAC SOC050000
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Table of Contents

Sons of Beer and Sons of Ben: Drink as a Social Marker in Seventeenth-Century England - Cedric C Brown
The Anacreontea and a Tradition of Refined Male Sociability - Stella Achilleos
Tavern Societies, the Inns of Court, and the Culture of Conviviality in Early Seventeenth-Century London - Michelle O'Callaghan
Wine for Comfort: Drinking and the Royalist Exile Experience, 1642-1660 - Marika Keblusek
Roaring Royalists and Ranting Brewers: the Politicisation of Drink and Drunkenness in Political Broadside Ballads from 1640 to 16891689 - Angela McShane
'Be sometimes to your country true': the Politics of Wine in England, 1660-1714 - Charles C Ludington
Circe's Cup: Wine and Women in Early Modern Drama - Karen Britland
Drink, Sex and Power in Restoration Comedy - Susan J Owen
'Health, Strength and Happiness': Medical Constructions of Wine and Beer in Early Modern England (with Tanya Cassidy) - Louise Curth
'Health, Strength and Happiness': Medical Constructions of Wine and Beer in Early Modern England (with Louise Curth) - Tanya Cassidy
Drinking Cider in Paradise: Science, Improvement, and the Politics of Fruit-Trees - Vittoria Di Palma
A Natural Drink for an English Man: National Stereotyping in Early Modern Culture - Charlotte McBride
'It were far better to be a Toad, or a Serpant, then a Drunkart': Writing about Drunkenness - Adam Smyth

Reviews

Raises important, new questions and constructs some key themes that point the way for future research. H-NET BOOK REVIEW
Handsomely produced and a pleasure to read... Provides a welcome addition to a lively field and an invitation for further interdisciplinary exchange. SIXTEENTH CENTURY JOURNAL
Makes a worthwhile contribution to the new cultural history. (...) To date, we have possessed good publications on drinking venues in early modern England and drinking habits in modern times, but this collection breaks new ground in connecting the two. HISTORY

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